Ramadan Kareem!

Ramadan is one of the Holy Months in the Hijri (Lunar) Calendar in Islam. During this time Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset, and we mark the end with the celebration of Eid Al-Fitr (Literally means to break fast). During this time we will be releasing a few recipes that are healthy and delicious, which are perfect to have for Iftar (breaking the fast). Traditionally, one should break their fast on a Date, and then continue to have their prepared meal. Continue reading “Ramadan Kareem!”

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Basic Dough Recipe {عجين}

This dough recipe is good for any Lebanese appetizer/pies that requires dough. Including but not limited to meat pies, spinach pies, cheese pies, za’atar pies and even pizza!

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Yellow Cake – Sfouf {صفوف} (Egg Free)

Sfouf literally means “rows” in Arabic, so why is this cake called sfouf? Beats us! This cake gets it’s beautiful yellow color from the all natural spice known as Turmeric. Turmeric has been proven to have numerous health benefits and people are scrambling these days to incorporate this spice into their cooking. Turmeric has been shown to have a wide range of antioxidant, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, antimutagenic, anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory properties. In fact, it is so beneficial we had to write a whole article about it! Click here for the full read. We are proud to present to you one of the many ways you can use Turmeric in your home!

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Lazy Hummus {5 Minute Recipe}

Now that school’s back on, you don’t have all the time in the world. Here’s a quick pictorial on making hummus in your food processor! Who doesn’t love a one-bowl recipe and easy clean up?

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Osmaliyeh: Shredded Pastry with Cream {عثملية/عصمليه}

This dessert is super simple, and can be made by frying or baking. It tastes great plain but can be adapted to include various toppings to suit all taste buds!

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Kashta {قشطة}

Kashta is a basic filling for desserts that come from the Arabic world. If you do live in the Middle East you could buy this cream ready made from a local grocer, or even canned! The canned version is a thinner, and doesn’t at all resemble the good stuff. Home made is always the best way, and this recipe can be made super fast and stores well in the fridge.
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Atyr – Lebanese Simple Syrup {قطر}

This simple syrup is an essential component to almost all Arabic desserts, and has a distinct flavor due to the Rose & Blossom water.

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Qatayef {قطايف}

This is the kind of dessert that is perfect to take with you to a friends place. In Lebanese households whenever formal visits are made, the person invited always brings something along – most of the time it is dessert – because nobody can object to dessert.
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How to make the best Hummus {Lebanese Style}

Hummus is the arabic word for Chickpeas, or Garbanzo beans. Hummus is traditionally eaten in all parts of the Arab world, and each region makes it a little differently. This is the Lebanese style hummus that we grew up eating, usually with pita bread. Have you ever had a hummus sandwhich? Cause if you haven’t you are missing out – big time. Hummus was definitely not popular as we were growing up, but now you find people eating hummus with everything, and you find it everywhere! You could pretty much walk into any grocery store and buy some hummus, but it probably won’t be as good as this recipe. Actually we’re confident it won’t, because nothing beats home made. Also, packaged hummus doesn’t taste anything like the hummus we know.
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Welcome and why we chose to start this blog.

The Tabouli Bowl is here to bring you nutrition & lifestyle blogging from the perspective of five sisters.

A little more about why we started this blog:

Emma:

When I first got married, I thought I knew enough to cook and bake good Lebanese-fare without any help, but I soon learned that I was quite mistaken. While living at home it was easy to ask my mother about quantities, cooking times, procedures and all that, and I did not realize how much I relied on this quick tips from my mother being in the next room. I learned a lot while helping my mother prepare feasts on occasions and day to day meals. Apparently, no matter how much you know – unless you practice constantly you will need a written reference for future attempts. Eventually, you get the hang of it, and like any good chef or mother you learn the recipes and techniques by heart. I was lucky to grow up with a mother who taught me all I needed to know for when I would be on my own – and I could always call when I needed something. Sometimes said mother was busy, or at work so I would have to fend for myself. Now I have grown up in the “google everything” age, and I would do just that. However because some foods have Arabic titles/words I found little to no information about them. The foods that I did find were either a random recipe posted years ago – or very poorly written, with ingredients and steps missing. I used to think, “how great would it be if there was a website with all the Lebanese traditional recipes on it?” I won’t say I didn’t find attempts at those types of sites, but they were not easy to navigate or had recipes that called for ingredients that we do not use in our cooking.

From then, I began to keep text files on my computer with recipes and steps. I found my mother’s old notebook that she used to write recipes in that our grandmother taught her. It’s amazing how much historical importance and culture food can carry, isn’t it? You think it’s a simple recipe, but food is something that all humans need. Food is also something that is used in every culture to promote congregation and community. An old recipe handed down, withstanding the test of time. Anyways – I digress, back to why this blog was a good idea. It provides a quick reference to newly weds or young ladies, or even non-arabs…really anyone who want’s to cook Lebanese cuisine! There will also be tips that we find useful, and any other ideas we can think of.

We are aiming to include traditional Lebanese recipes, but more than that, because we are such a diverse family we decided to include lifestyle posts. Each one of us took a different path in life and thus have so many different ideas to offer! We hope we can also show you the nutritional aspects of Lebanese cuisine. We really just want to share what we love with the world. W

Hopefully our readers will enjoy the content and share it with friends & family to spread the word. Let us know how we are doing by leaving a comment on the post or on the Facebook Page or Twitter!